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FHS Career Vocational Technical Education Handbook

  • FALMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL CAREER VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL EDUCATION HANDBOOK 2021-2022

    Rigor, respect, and responsibility

    For every student, every day

    WELCOME

    Dear Parents and Guardians:

    Falmouth High School is committed to the concept of comprehensive education. Therefore, the school has a long-standing tradition of providing students with an array of learning opportunities. Included in these opportunities are seven Career Vocational Technical Education (CVTE) programs, two of which are Chapter 74 approved. All CVTE programs allow students to obtain critical skills for today’s workforce. Such opportunities also provide Falmouth High School graduates with opportunities for dual enrollment, technical certification, and true preparation for advanced technical training.

    When considering courses during the 2022 -23 school year, exploring classes in the Career Vocational Technical Education (CVTE) is an important step. The goal of this academic field is to get students prepared for multiple occupations. Courses are skill based and career modeled. Instructors are advised by community business leaders to inform about the most accurate trends in the job market.  

    Guidance counselors and CVTE instructors are available to guide students through various career pathways. The school website has additional information (https://www.falmouth.k12.ma.us/domain/717

    Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

    Sincerely,

    Henry St.Julien 
    CVTE School Coordinator
    hstjulien@falmouth.k12.ma.us
    508-540-2200 ext. 4049

    ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

    Mary Gans
    Principal

    Paula Carlson
    Principal’s Secretary

    Thomas McManamon
    Assistant Principal of Academic Programs

    Henry St. Julien
    Assistant Principal and CVTE Building Coordinator

    Gretchen Lennox and Susan Dowling
    Secretaries to the Assistant Principals

    Audra Reilly
    Special Education Building Administrator
    Kathleen Pokraka
    Special Education Secretary

    GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT

    Alan Kazarian
    Director of Guidance

    Guidance Counselors
    Susannah Brooks
    Kurt Lawson
    Rachael Paine
    Lindsay Ruthven

    Guidance Secretaries
    Joanne Carrara
    Patricia Malone

    SUPPORT STAFF AND CLINICIANS

    School Adjustment Counselors
    Catherine Fauth
    Katie Lebherz
    Siobhan McHugh-Mullane
    Heather Nevulis

    School Psychologist
    Nicole Kennedy

    MISSION, VISION, EXPECTATIONS

    MISSION

    RIGOR, RESPECT, AND RESPONSIBILITY

    Falmouth High School provides students the opportunity to become skillful, life-long learners—through a rigorous and diverse curriculum—and to become responsible, productive citizens in society.

    VISION

    Students graduate from Falmouth High School college and career ready.  Over the course of their high school enrollment, they develop the habits of mind that enable them to achieve their goals as they engage in both their local and global communities.

    ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS

    as measured by the FHS Skills Rubrics

    Students at Falmouth High School will effectively:

    • write,
    • read,
    • problem solve,
    • seek information,
    • present information, and
    • complete assignments using their well-developed ‘habits of mind’.

    SOCIAL EXPECTATIONS

    as measured by FHS discipline and attendance data as well as community involvement as collected in the VIPS database

    Students at Falmouth High School will:

    • assume responsibility for their own behavior and choices;
    • demonstrate respect for themselves, others, and property; and
    • demonstrate honesty and integrity.

    CIVIC EXPECTATIONS

    as measured by participation in school-sponsored civic engagement and activities as well as community involvement as collected in the VIPS database

    Students at Falmouth High School will:

    • participate in school and community programs that provide experience in leadership, decision making, and service; and
    • demonstrate knowledge of the civic rights, duties, and responsibilities within the democratic process.

    STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

    Falmouth High School 

    rigor, respect & responsibility

     

    Falmouth High School's purpose is to build a community of learners reaching for their full potential.  Falmouth High School recognizes the necessity of providing a challenging academic curriculum, one which fosters the mastery of knowledge in content areas. Falmouth High School also recognizes the importance of promoting the development of essential skills and personal quality characteristics.  Because of our school's diverse cultural and economic make-up, our purpose is to provide a broad curriculum, one that recognizes individual needs and goals while it challenges all to grow intellectually and socially as they work to meet established high standards and expectations.

    Our purpose is also to create a safe, orderly environment, where all members of this community share the responsibility for promoting and maintaining an atmosphere in which each feels respected and valued, supported as he or she accepts challenges and takes risks, and encouraged to learn from his or her mistakes. Falmouth High School also recognizes the importance of maintaining an on-going process of self-assessment and of refining all aspects of the school community to improve and maintain the opportunities students have to become well-informed, thoughtful, responsible, productive citizens.

    OUR PORTRAIT OF A GRADUATE

    CHARTING THE COURSE TO GRADUATION

    The Falmouth Public Schools reflected on how the Clipper voyage has led us through years of growth punctuated by countless examples of achievement and success. This work allowed us to identify the parts of our history that have become traditions we honor and carry forward in our continued work. Then, we paused, evaluated the winds, and thought about where the journey is now leading. We considered our true north, wondered what new adventures awaited, and reoriented ourselves. We know we are yet to experience new forms of success. The result, Charting the Course to Graduation, is our vision of teaching and learning to prepare students to face their own unknown. It elevates current practice and stimulates new thinking. It demands students and teachers both navigate the way forward together as learners. Together, we are Clippers. Yet, no matter where we go, we each can proudly reflect on our journey and affirm that our identity as a learner was shaped by our time in Falmouth. Each can say, I AM A CLIPPER!

     

    C - I am creative.

    I can apply my understanding to problem solving. 

    I can reflect, revise, and reimagine solutions to find the best one.

    I can take risks through learning. 

    I can be independent and flexible.

    L - I am a learner.

    I can receive, evaluate, and synthesize information.

    I can make meaning that informs continued content and skill development.

    I can transfer knowledge and skills to novel situations, and/or apply them to a problem solving process, which spans college, career, military, citizenship, and/or civic engagement.

    I - I am inquisitive.

    I can actively and eagerly explore ideas and demonstrate curiosity.

    I can appropriately and respectfully question, investigate, challenge, analyze, and/or conduct research to forge understandings.

    I can seek information from a variety of sources.

    P - I am a participant.

    I can engage, interact, and invest in learning.

    I can enhance the learning of others.

    I can explore, evaluate, and pursue my future career and education options.

    P - I am a partner.

    I can compassionately demonstrate collaborative norms when working with peers, instructors, partners, and all within the learning community.

    E - I am an effective communicator. 

    I can convey my thinking verbally and nonverbally, in a number of ways.

    I can listen and participate in open two-way feedback. I am receptive and responsive to others' input.

    I can speak and/or write with easily understood language that is both direct and clear.

    R - I am resilient.

    I can change course, adapt, and recover from obstacles and setbacks, whether they are social, emotional, or academic. 

    I can seek influences that positively affect my thinking and identity.

    I can recognize that my mistakes will always be a part of my learning.

    I can make sound financial, legal, personal, and professional decisions and live independently after graduation. 

    CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

    School Coordinator: Mr. Henry St. Julien

    Extension 4048 or 4049

    hstjulien@falmouth.k12.ma.us

    District Coordinator: Dr. Sonia Tellier

    508.548.0151, extension 130

    stellier@falmouth.k12.ma.us

    Instructional Staff: J. Brooks, L. Campbell, M. Campbell, K. Hackett, L. Hart, J. Rocha, R. Webber

    General Information

    VISION

    Falmouth High School is committed to the concept of comprehensive education. Therefore, the school has a long-standing tradition of providing students with an array of learning opportunities. A number of these opportunities are aligned with the frameworks for Career Vocational Technical Education (CVTE), allowing students to obtain critical skills for today’s workforce. Such opportunities also provide Falmouth High School graduates with opportunities for dual enrollment, technical certification and true preparation for advanced technical training. A number of our CVTE students also take advantage of college enrollment at both two- and four-year programs.

    CVTE Program 

    Instructor

    Technical Certification

    Early Education & Care

    (FHS Preschool)

    Mrs. Lynn Campbell

    Massachusetts EEC Certification/

    Early Education and Care Certification

    CPR Certification

    Design and Visual Communications

    Ms. Larisa Hart

    Adobe Certification

    Woodworking Technology

    Mr. James Brooks

    Occupational Safety Health Administration.

    OSHA 10 HR Construction Certification

    Business Marketing

    Ms. Janet Rocha

    Occupational Safety Health Administration.

    OSHA 10 HR General Industry Certification

    Culinary

    Ms. Kaitlin Hackett

    ServSafe Food Handler Certificate

    ServSafe Allergen Certificate

    Technology: Programming and

    Web Development

    Mr. Michael Campbell

    Computer Science Principles Exam

    Arduino Certification

    3D Printing Certification

    Video Production

    Mr. Ryan Webber

    Occupational Safety Health Administration.

    OSHA 10 HR General Industry Certification

     

    Student Admission Guidelines & Procedures

    1. INTRODUCTION

    An admission process is necessary for career vocational technical education (CVTE) programs in which there are more applicants than openings. A process is necessary to determine which applicants may most benefit from such educational opportunities. All applicants to the CVTE programs for grades nine through twelve at Falmouth High School will be evaluated using the selection criteria contained in this Admission Policy. 

     

    Current CVTE Programs at FHS:

    Business Marketing

    Culinary

    Design and Visual Communications 

    Early Education and Care

           Technology: Programming and Web Development

           Video Production

    Woodworking Technology 

     

    1. EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY

    Falmouth High School admits students and makes available to them its advantages, privileges and complete program of study without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability. If there is a student with limited English proficiency, a qualified staff member from Falmouth High School will assist the applicant in completing the necessary forms and assist in interpreting during the entire application and admission process upon the request of the applicant. Disabled students may voluntarily self-identify for the purpose of requesting reasonable accommodations during the entire application and admission process. 

     

    Information on limited English proficiency and/or disability submitted voluntarily by the applicant, for the purpose of receiving assistance and accommodations during the entire application and admission process, will not affect the applicant’s admission to the CVTE program. This section of the admission policy is aligned with the Falmouth Public Schools’ “Equal Educational Opportunities” and the “Programs for Students with Disabilities” policies.

     

    III. ELIGIBILITY

    Any eighth grade student at the Lawrence School as well as any ninth, tenth or eleventh grade student who is a student at Falmouth High School is eligible to apply for fall admission or admission during the school year subject to the availability of openings to CVTE programs at Falmouth High School. 

     

    Resident students will be evaluated using the selection criteria contained in this admission policy. Priority for admission is given to Falmouth residents. Students who are not residents of the Falmouth Public School District are eligible to apply for fall admission or admission during the school year provided they expect to be promoted to the grade they seek to enter by their current school. Nonresident students will be evaluated using the selection criteria contained in this admission policy.

     

    Transfer students from vocational technical schools are eligible to apply for fall admission or admission during the school year to CVTE programs grades 9-12 at Falmouth High School provided they expect to be promoted to the grade they seek to enter by their current school. Transfer students will be evaluated using the selection criteria contained in this admission policy.





    1. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

    Falmouth High School is a comprehensive, public secondary school located in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  Falmouth High School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is committed to providing quality academic and CVTE programs. It is the responsibility of the Falmouth High School Principal to supervise the administration of the policies and procedures required to admit and enroll applicants in conformity with this admission policy.

     

    Falmouth High School has an Admission Committee appointed by the Principal. The committee consists of the Administrator of Academic Programs and the Director of Guidance. Responsibilities of the Admissions Committee include:

    1. determination of standards for admission
    2. development and implementation of admission procedures
    3. processing of applications
    4. ranking of students
    5. acceptance of students according to the procedure and criteria in the admission policy
    6. establishment and maintenance of a waiting list of acceptable candidates

     

    The Assistant Principal of Falmouth High School, serving in the role of CVTE Director, is responsible for disseminating information about Falmouth High School’s CVTE programs through local school assemblies and press releases, and for collecting applications from students. Falmouth High School participates in the School Choice Program.

     

    1. RECRUITMENT PROCESS

    The Falmouth High School CVTE School Coordinator disseminates information about the programs through a variety of methods.

    1. Visitations with an informational slide presentation to 8th grade classes at Lawrence School from October to January are scheduled.
    2. An Open House during the fall is scheduled. Prospective students and their parent(s)/guardian(s) have an opportunity to visit CVTE programs and speak with teachers as well as view a presentation about related course offerings.
    3. Parent(s)/guardian(s) may schedule individual visits at a mutually convenient time.
    4. Brochures, which describe Falmouth High School’s CVTE programs, including academic courses and special education resources, are distributed during the 8th grade visitations, an Open House, Program of Studies presentations, and Freshman Orientation.

     

    1. APPLICATION PROCESS

    APPLICATION PROCESS FOR FALL ADMISSION* TO THE VARIOUS CVTE PROGRAMS

    1. Students interested in applying for admission to the various CVTE programs for fall admission must:
    2. Obtain an application from the Falmouth High School CVTE School Coordinator as early in the school year as possible. One application is all that is needed. It will cover admission to all CVTE programs in the event that a student is interested in more than one program.
    3. Return the completed application form to the Falmouth High School CVTE School Coordinator by the deadline set by the Falmouth High School CVTE School Coordinator.
    4. If incomplete applications are received, the following procedures will be followed:
    5. The applicant's parent(s)/guardian(s) will be notified by mail by the Falmouth High School CVTE Director.
    6. If after notifying the parent(s)/guardian(s), the application remains incomplete for ten school days, the application will be voided.

     

    APPLICATION PROCESS FOR ADMISSION TO THE NINTH, TENTH, ELEVENTH AND  TWELFTH GRADE PROGRAMS FOR THE CURRENT SCHOOL YEAR*

    1. Students interested in applying for admission to the CVTE programs at Falmouth High School for admission for the current school year must:
    2. Obtain an application from the Falmouth High School CVTE Director. One application is all that is needed. It will cover admission to all the CVTE programs in the event that a student is interested in more than one program.
    3. Return the completed application form to the Falmouth High School CVTE Director by the deadline set by the Falmouth High School CVTE Director.
    4. If incomplete applications are received, the following procedures will be followed:
    5. The applicant's parent(s)/guardian(s) will be notified by mail by the CVTE Director at Falmouth High School.
    6. If after notifying the parent(s)/guardian(s), the application remains incomplete for ten school days, the application will be voided.

     

    LATE APPLICATIONS

    Applications received after the deadline may not be accepted. If accepted, they will be evaluated using the same criteria as other applications and their composite score will be computed. They will be placed in rank order on the established waiting list.

     

    TRANSFER STUDENTS

    Applications from students who are enrolled in a state-approved (Chapter 74) vocational technical high school program in another school (transfer students) will be considered for admission (including admission during the school year) if they relocate from their current school and wish to pursue the same program of study at Falmouth High School. All transfer applicants must attend an informational meeting at Falmouth High School. If the applicant or parent/guardian cannot provide transportation, an official from Falmouth High School will go to the local school to meet with the applicant. Their applications will be evaluated according to the selection criteria contained in this admission policy.

     

    WITHDRAWN STUDENTS

    Students who withdraw from Falmouth High School’s CVTE programs may reapply for admission to said programs following the procedures contained in this admission policy and will be evaluated using the selection criteria contained in this admission policy.

     

    VII. SELECTION CRITERIA

    Students who complete an application for admission to the CVTE programs participate in a half school year vocational technical introductory program designed to help them learn about their talents and interests relative to available CVTE programs. In addition, CVTE teachers evaluate students during the introductory program. Students initially explore their preferred CVTE program by attending an informational meeting. Then, they meet with CVTE teachers in small group sessions. This is followed by enrollment in a semester-long level I introductory course in the preferred program. The application to the CVTE program must be accompanied by a transcript demonstrating successful completion of the level I introductory course.

     

    Students who enroll in Falmouth High School after grade nine may explore CVTE programs that have openings, before making a program selection. Students are evaluated and graded by each program teacher during the period of exploration (i.e., enrollment in a semester-long level I introductory course in the preferred program). If the number of enrollees seeking a particular program exceeds the number of openings, the evaluative grades received by the students rank order would determine the enrollee or enrollees who are placed in the particular program.

     

    Each shop teacher evaluates students during the level I enrollment. They are evaluated and scored (total of 0-100 points) on program grades received throughout the semester (25 points), attendance (25 points), discipline/conduct (25 points) and recommendations from CVTE instructors (25 points). A maximum of 100 points could be earned for the semester.

     

    SELECTION PROCESS

    Students are admitted into the program of their choice based on the point total they received during the introductory enrollment period. For example, a student with a point total of 92 would be admitted before a student with a point total of 90. If a program fills, based on point total, before a student gets his/her first choice, the student is placed on a waiting list for the desired program. Again, the student is admitted based upon overall point total. 

     

    WITHDRAWAL PROCESS

    If a student seeks withdrawal from a CVTE program, he/she will meet with his/her guidance counselor and the CVTE Director to be interviewed and individually counseled in regards to the reasons cited in the petition for withdrawal. Should withdrawal from the CVTE program be granted, the student will need to define a plan for graduation in accordance with Falmouth High School’s local, non-CVTE graduation requirements.

     

    VIII. REVIEW

    The applicant's parent(s)/guardian(s), upon receipt of a letter from Falmouth High School indicating that the applicant was not accepted or was placed on a waitlist for a particular program, may request a review of the decision by sending a letter requesting a review to the Falmouth High School Principal within thirty days of the receipt of the rejection/waitlist letter. The Falmouth High School Principal will respond in writing to the letter with the findings of the review within thirty days.

     

    This admission policy is currently under review by the Falmouth School Committee.

     

    Pathways & Courses

    All programs offer introductory courses that Falmouth High School students are able to complete for elective credit. Yet, each also offers a dedicated series of courses, called a pathway, that must be taken to prepare the student for appropriate assessments for technical certifications in the field. The following includes descriptions of the core pathway for each of these six programs.

    BUSINESS MARKETING PATHWAY

    Students may take courses in Business to prepare for an entry-level job immediately after high school or to prepare for a major in business school, community college, or a four-year college/university. The program provides skills training for immediate entry into today’s workforce as well as preparation for advanced studies in the fields of Accounting, Banking, Finance, Economics, Marketing and Business Administration. The enrolled student is afforded the opportunity to acquire a strong foundation for success in advanced courses at the college level as well as the acquisition of digital literacy skills. These courses utilize the FHS Rubrics, as well as project checklists, to assess students.  Through enrollment, students learn how to manage their time effectively, engage in two-way communication and participate in a collaborative team. In addition, core financial literacy skills are learned in the foundational courses.

    Business Marketing Pathway
    Completion of this pathway will result in: Occupational Safety Health Administration
    OSHA 10 HR General Industry Certification

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    9-12

    Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance

    Semester Long

    • Business Environment: economics; law & ethics; forms of ownership; business in a global economy
    • Business Management: entrepreneurship; organizational structure, management & leadership; human resources
    • Marketing: introduction to marketing; the 4 Ps; selling 
    • Business Finance: risk management; banking; credit; financial management

    10-12





    Fundamentals of Marketing

    Semester Long

    • Researching and developing a marketing plan
    • Conducting marketing research
    • Branding and pricing strategies
    • Developing an ad campaign

    10-12

    Accounting for a Sole Proprietorship 

    Semester Long

    • Double entry accounting procedures
    • Accounting in the real world
    • Business ethics

    10-12

    Entrepreneurship

    Semester Long

    • Creating a business plan
    • Start-up options for the new business
    • Operating the business
    • Expanding and exiting the business
    • Understanding trade agreements and trade barriers
    • Case studies of real entrepreneurs

    Additional Business Courses Available

    10-12

    Personal Finance

    Semester Long

    • Budgeting and saving
    • Investing
    • Earning power
    • Borrowing
    • Financial services
    • Insurance

    10-12

    Accounting for a Corporation

    Semester Long

    • Double entry accounting procedures
    • Accounting in the real world
    • Business ethics

    11+12

    Employment 101

    Semester Long

    • Resume & cover letter writing
    • Interviewing
    • Workplace skills
    • Ethics at work

    12

    Career Internship

    Semester Long

    • Workplace skills
    • Ethics at work
    • On-the-job skills training/observation

    BUSINESS MARKETING COURSES

     

    7020 Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance CP Semester Grades 9-12 2 Credits

    This course will introduce students to business environments, business management, marketing, and finance in an easy-to-understand manner that helps them connect the concepts of business to their everyday lives.  Students will be provided learning opportunities that address the following topics: organizational structures; entrepreneurship; management practices; the four Ps of marketing and marketing strategies; risk management, banking, and credit.  Students will learn basic principles and concepts of the free enterprise system, global business, ethics, and business law.  This introductory course prepares students for further study of business courses. TEXT: Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance, G-W Publisher, 2017, Robert L. Dansby, Chris Gassen, Brenda Clark

    7025 Fundamentals of Marketing CP Semester Grades 10-12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance.  This course introduces students to the exciting world of marketing.  It is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of marketing concepts and to prepare them for further study after high school.  Students will learn how products progress from the idea stage to store shelves.  They will explore concepts such as the four “Ps” – product, price, place, and promotion; marketing research; target market identification; product distribution; and sales.  TEXT: Marketing Dynamics, 4th Edition, G-W Publisher, 2019, Brenda Clark, Cynthia Gendall Basteri, Chris Gassen, and Michelle Walker

    7021 Personal Finance CP Semester Grades 10, 11, 12 2 Credits

    This course is designed to help students make wise decisions about money.  Students will focus on money management; personal income tax; credit management, credit cards, consumer protection laws; banking services; investing; housing; and automobile, life, and property insurance.  Students use Google Docs and Sheets, as well as the Internet for online tutorials, videos, and viewing of guest speaker presentations.  In addition, students will use a virtual simulation that challenges them to live on their own.

    7022 Accounting for a Sole Proprietorship CP, Honors Semester Grades 10-12 2 Credits

    This course is for those who intend to own their own business and prepares them for advanced study of accounting practices.  Emphasis is placed on the reasons and the purpose of accounting and not exclusively on the mechanical procedure.  Computer applications will be used extensively for accounting procedures.  Those who enroll in this course for honors credit will have additional assessment criteria that emphasize the analytical aspects of business.  TEXT: 21st Century Accounting; Cengage Learning, 2014; Gilbertson, Lehman, and Gentene

    7023 Accounting for a Corporation CP, Honors Semester Grades 10-12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting for a Sole Proprietorship.  This course is for those who are interested in working in finance, business management, or administration.  Students will participate in corporate and managerial accounting for merchandising business.  Emphasis is placed on the reasons for and the purpose of accounting and not exclusively on mechanical procedure.  Computer applications will be used extensively for accounting procedures.  Students will engage in virtual simulations that challenge them to apply procedures and practice business-making decisions.  This course will prepare students for entry-level employment as a bookkeeper or accounting clerk, and for studying business in college.  Those who enroll in this course for honors credit will have additional assessment criteria that emphasize the analytical aspects of business.  TEXT: 21st Century Accounting; Cengage Learning, 2014; Gilbertson, Lehman, and Gentene

    TBA Entrepreneurship CP Semester Grades 10-12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Fundamentals of Marketing and Accounting for a Sole Proprietorship.  This course introduces students to the risks and rewards of business ownership with a project-based pedagogy and a foundation in economic concepts. It is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of entrepreneurial concepts and to prepare them for further study after high school.  Students are guided through the elements and creation of a business plan, using a step-by-step narrative for selecting an idea for a business, social and ethical responsibilities, start-up options for the new business, operating the business, and expanding and exiting the business.TEXT: TBD

     

    7024 Employment 101 CP Semester Grades 11-12 2 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare students for a work-based learning experience and for further education or employment upon graduation.  Upon successful completion of this course, students may elect to participate in a senior internship experience.  Focus points of the course include: understanding how values, goals, and decisions impact life and career; occupational interests, aptitudes, and abilities; development of a career path for a selected occupation; conducting a job search; completing application forms; constructing a resume; developing a letter of application/cover letter; arranging an interview; job interview skills; completing employment tests; demonstrating appropriate appearance; understanding employer expectations; time management; and appropriately quitting a job.

    9770  Senior Internship CP Length TBD Grade 12 Credits TBD

    The Senior Internship combines academics and service in an independent learning format. The Internship can also combine academics with an out-of-school work experience. Interested students must develop, present and implement an academic/service/work-based project proposal. In establishing eligibility, a student’s academic progress, attendance, and discipline records will be considered. A completed application must be submitted prior to the close of school if work is to be done during the first semester of the school year. If the internship will be completed as part of the second semester, then a completed proposal must be submitted by November 1st. Forms are available in the Guidance Office. Students must make an appointment with Ms. Rocha to review their completed application and make any necessary revisions. Appointments will not be made with a student until the entire application packet is completed. You must submit the completed packet to Ms. Rocha when you schedule your appointment.  

    “I am working on real-world research with Henry Dick, a world renowned geophysicist. I entered data compiled in a book into a database, and now I am analyzing it to help answer a research question. The information is very specialized. I may not even study this content again until late in college. I’m seeing where this field is moving toward, not just where it is now.”
    Tyler Hampton, FHS Graduate, regarding his internship at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

     

    CULINARY PATHWAY


    This pathway begins with an introduction to basic skills required for food preparation and an understanding of nutrition principles. Students demonstrate safe food practices to prevent food borne illnesses, prepare nutritious foods with healthy cooking methods, create problem-solving strategies to eat well and increase physical activity, and exhibit nutritious menu planning skills. Laboratory work includes healthy breakfast and dinner options that focus on whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and sources of lean protein or meat alternatives. In accordance with the Falmouth High School Problem-Solver Rubric, students will carry out multi-step tasks to completion with minimal assistance. As a problem solver, students make connections between nutrition principles and personal choices.  As students progress through this pathway, they advance this learning and earn their ServSafe Food Handler certificate—an industry recognized credential from the National Restaurant Association. 

     

    Culinary Pathway

    Completion of this pathway will result in: ServSafe Allergen Certificate 

    ServSafe Food Handler Certificate

     

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    9-12

    Food for Healthy Living (Culinary I)


    Semester Long

    Complete a safety credential program: ServSafe Allergen

    Demonstrate kitchen and food safety

    Apply the fundamentals of food service:

    • demonstrate proper measuring techniques
    • explain mise en place 
    • read, analyze and follow standard recipes
    • demonstrate basic knife skills
    • demonstrate utility services 
    • explain basic nutrition 
    • practice a variety of moist- and dry- cooking techniques to plan and prepare plant-based meals and snacks
    • set personal SMART goals for nutrition and wellness

    10-12

    Baking and Pastry Arts

    Semester Long

    Apply the fundamentals of baking:

    • identify ingredients used
    • describe properties and functions of ingredients
    • select equipment for specific baking applications
    • identify mixing methods
    • identify healthier alternatives or substitutions 
    • Prepare and finish a variety of professional quality baked goods and desserts  

    10-12

    Global Gourmet (Culinary II)


    Semester Long

    Complete a safety credential program: ServSafe Food Handler

    Evaluate traditional international cooking and diets to: 

    • apply the fundamentals of food service (above)
    • plan menus
    • practice a variety of cooking methods
    • prepare grains, legumes, and starches
    • prepare stocks, soups, and sauces 
    • prepare various types of meat, seafood, poultry
    • prepare sandwiches
    • prepare garnishes, hors d’oeuvres, and appetizers

    11-12

    Restaurant Management

    Semester Long

    Apply the essentials of restaurant management:

    • menu planning, ordering, receiving and storing all food products,
    • calculate food and labor costs to calculate the total cost of the menu, 
    • control costs in foodservice. 
    • demonstrate practices required to start, manage, and market a business,  
    • apply financial concepts required in the food industry

    12

    Independent Study

    Semester Long

    Business Program

     

    CULINARY COURSE

     

    9401 Culinary Arts I: Foods for Healthy Living CP Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits

    This is an introduction to basic skills required for food preparation and an understanding of nutrition principles. Students will demonstrate safe food practices to prevent food borne illnesses, prepare nutritious foods with healthy cooking methods, create problem-solving strategies to eat well and increase physical activity, and exhibit nutritious menu planning skills.  Laboratory work includes healthy breakfast and dinner options that focus on whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and sources of lean protein or meat alternatives. In accordance with the Falmouth High School Problem-Solver Rubric, students will carry out multi-step tasks to completion with minimal assistance. As a problem solver, students make connections between nutrition principles and personal choices.

    9402 Culinary Arts II: The Global Gourmet CP Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foods for Healthy Living & teacher recommendation, or for seniors -permission of the instructor.  This is an advanced study in food preparation that includes meats.  Safe food handling and preparation is a major focus.  Students analyze the relationship between the traditional diets of the Mediterranean, the Latin American, and the Asian regions of the world and health.  Students research and prepare dishes that reflect these traditional diets. Foods prepared in Global Gourmet require more difficult preparation techniques that improve their skills in the handling and preparation of foods.  As problem solvers, students demonstrate the ability to choose challenging learning experiences. As part of the course project students independently prepare foods for the class. Students will earn a ServSafe Food Handler certificate upon completing the ServSafe Food Handler curriculum and passing the program assessment.   

     

    9403 Baking and Pastry Arts CP Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foods for Healthy Living & teacher recommendation, or for seniors -permission of the instructor.  This class introduces students to techniques of combining basic ingredients to produce classical baked goods. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of proper procedures, understanding of ingredients and their use, and an appreciation of artistic presentation. Students will prepare quality seasonal baked goods and pastries using a variety of techniques.  Laboratory work includes: candy making, breads, quick breads, rolled-in products, pies, cakes, cookies, and specialty desserts.  In accordance with the Falmouth High School Information Seeker and Organizer Rubric, students will investigate the purposes of ingredients and synthesize what happens to ingredients during preparation and baking.  As problem-solvers, students will carry out multi-step tasks to completion.

    Restaurant Management CP Semester Grades 11-12  2 Credits 

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary 1, Culinary 2, and Baking & Pastry Arts, & teacher recommendation, or for seniors -permission of the instructor. This course covers essentials of restaurant management as students manage and maintain the Clipper Cafe a la carte restaurant and pre-order sales.  Students will apply the fundamentals of menu planning, ordering, receiving and storing all food products, and calculate food and labor costs to calculate the total cost of the menu, ultimately controlling costs in foodservice. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the practices required to start, manage, and market a business, and apply financial concepts required in the food industry. Specific topics include: principles of control in a foodservice operation; menu planning as a control tool; cost control in purchasing, receiving, storage, and inventory management; cost control from production to waste management; labor cost control; beverage cost control; operating budget and performance reports; revenue control; financial management; and controlling costs through technology. 

     

    DESIGN & VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS PATHWAY


    Introducing the Adobe Creative Suite, pathway focuses on solving design challenges for print communications as well as personal visual expression. Students apply the elements and principles of design while exploring typography, layout, composition, and image manipulation. Students learn various modes of capturing original imagery as well as how to create digital images using electronic drawing software. Assessment is based on pre-planning, project specific rubrics, and teacher observation of work habits and technical/creative growth. Students with an interest in print communications and/or digital art are encouraged to take this pathway and develop a portfolio to showcase their work. 

    Design & Visual Communications Pathway
    Completion of this pathway will result in: Adobe Certification

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    9-12

    Graphic Design I

    Semester Long

    • Intro to the iMac
    • File Management
    • Elements of Design
    • Intro to Adobe Photoshop
    • Intro to Adobe Illustrator
    • Intro to InDesign
    • Intro to Typography

    10-12

    Graphic Design II

    Semester Long

    • Intermediate Adobe Photoshop
    • Intermediate Adobe Illustrator
    • Intermediate Adobe InDesign
    • Intermediate Color Theory
    • Principles of Design
    • Intermediate Typography

    11-12

    Graphic Design III

    Year Long

    • Advanced Adobe Photoshop
    • Advanced Adobe Illustrator
    • Advanced Adobe InDesign
    • Advanced Color Theory
    • Advanced Typography
    • The Critique Process
    • The Design Process
    • Portfolio Development
    • Design Shop

    12

    Graphic Design IV

    Year Long

    • Independent study
    • Design Shop
    • Teacher Assistant




    Design and Visual Communication COURSES

    7120 Graphic Design CP Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits

    Introducing the Adobe Creative Suite, this course focuses on solving design challenges for print communications as well as personal visual expression.   Students are introduced to the Mac computer environment and learn the basics of file management and naming conventions.  Students apply the elements and principles of design while exploring typography, layout, composition, and image manipulation. Students learn various modes of capturing original imagery as well as how to create digital images using electronic drawing software. Assessment is based on pre-planning, project specific rubrics, and teacher observation of work habits and technical/creative growth. Students with an interest in print communications and/or digital art are encouraged to take this course.

    7124 Graphic Design 2 CP Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design CP1. This course expands upon students understanding of solving complex design challenges by exploring more advanced techniques using Adobe Creative Suite. Students continue to explore the elements and principles of design to create original print communications and artistic expressions. Students learn the basics of color theory and are encouraged to pursue personal creative interests.

    7122 Graphic Design 3 CP Year Grades 11, 12 4 Credits

    7123 Graphic Design 4 CP Year Grades 11, 12 4 Credits

    These courses continue to build students’ knowledge and experience working with the Adobe Creative Suite to solve design challenges. The increasingly complex projects require learning sophisticated techniques that demonstrate research, critical thinking and refinement of products. These offerings are for those who are interested in pursuing graphic design, animation, web design, game boarding, and/or communication studies. Students may have an opportunity to earn an Adobe Certified Associate certificate with passing a multiple choice and online simulation exam. Students who earn an ACA designation are armed with the credentials to get summer internships, a first job out of school and may be eligible for credit in college level programs in design.  Students build a design portfolio that can be utilized in both print and online versions.

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE PATHWAY


    This program focuses on early childhood education.  Students learn about the physical, cognitive and social/ emotional development of a child, first in the classroom and then as part of the Preschool at Falmouth High School. Student interns can further their knowledge by continuing in outside placements either in the public elementary schools or the private sector.  This program is Chapter 74 approved as a fully-endorsed CVTE program.

     

    Early Education & Care Pathway

    Completion of this pathway will result in: Massachusetts EEC Certification/

    Early Education and Care Certification

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    10+11

    Child Growth and Development

    Year Long

    • Study of development from conception thru adolescents
    • Study of theorists
    • Study of development including physical, social and emotional

    11+12

    Child Care Aide

    Year Long

    • Preschool internship
    • Use of learned development of children
    • Health and safety of children
    • Plan lessons for appropriate age
    • Observation of children
    • Observation of teachers

    12

    Child Care Internship

    Year Long

    • K-3 internship
    • Continued use of learned development of children
    • Health and safety of children
    • Plan lessons for appropriate age
    • Observation of children
    • Observation of teachers

     

    EARLY EDUCATION AND CARE COURSES

    Program Goals

    Throughout enrollment in the Early Education and Care Program, Falmouth High School students will 

    • develop a comprehensive understanding of child development
    • understand differences between physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth
    • understand how theorists and researchers contribute to field
    • provide direct instruction to early education students ages 3 to 5
    • develop and implement dramatic play areas, learning centers, science experiments, and art ideas
    • promote self-reflection and self-direction
    • strengthen students’ communication skills

    9608 Child Development CP Year Grades 10-12 4 Credits

    Throughout this course, students develop a complete understanding of child development as they learn about physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth. Students also learn about different theorists and gain a working knowledge of their contributions to our collective understanding of child development. Students have opportunities to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of child development, produce journal entries outlining their own development, apply knowledge to practical child rearing and child observation, produce materials applicable to different age groups, understand the important role parents, teachers, and peers impact on a child’s development and self-esteem. Students also have the opportunity to study specific areas of individual interest and produce written and oral presentations to showcase their findings. Students are regularly assessed in accordance with the FHS Skills Rubric for Information Seekers and Organizers. 

    9605 Child Care Aide CP Year Grades 11, 12 8 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Child Development and teacher recommendation.  Child Development principles are applied in a student-run nursery school. Along with teaching in the preschool, students have the opportunity to put their creative talents to work developing and implementing dramatic play areas, learning centers, science experiments, and art ideas. Class time also includes analytical observation of preschool-aged children and the study of early childhood theory and philosophy. A necessary requirement for this course is an enthusiastic involvement and a sincere interest in working with children. Using the FHS Rubrics for Problem Solvers and Presenters, students develop professional teaching skills and carry out teaching responsibilities in the FHS Preschool and community volunteer internships. 

    9606 Child Care Internship CP Year Grade 12 8 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Child Care Aide experienceThe internship offers an advanced second year experience in pre-school education. Students gain increased practice with methods and materials for teaching. Major projects and volunteering in community projects are required as well as outside reading and an observation journal. Using the FHS Rubrics for Readers, Writers, and Problem Solvers, students develop refined communication skills and apply these skills to real-life issues related to developing healthy relationships. 

    TECHNOLOGY: PROGRAMMING AND WEB DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY


    Students may take courses to prepare them for an entry-level job immediately after high school or to prepare for a degree in Computer Science at a two- or four-year college program. Aimed at addressing the growing demand for IT professionals across all industries, students will learn the fundamentals to computer programming, web development and networking. Such topics include: Human Computer Interaction, Data Analysis and Visualization, Object-Oriented computer languages, Internet Protocols and Networking, Mobile Communication, and Robotics.

     

    Technology: Programming and Web Development Pathway

    Completion of this pathway will result in: Computer Science Principles Exam

    Arduino Certification

    3D Printing Certification

     

    Pathway

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills


    Computer Science I


    11


    Computer Science Principles

    • Creative Development 
    • Data
    • Algorithms and Programming
    • Computer Systems and Networks
    • Impact of Computing

    Computer Science II


    12


    Introduction to Programming

    Semester Long

    • Variables and types in Java
    • Arithmetic operations in Java
    • Conditional operators and loop flow controls
    • Fundamentals of object-oriented programming in Java

    Programming II

    Semester Long

    • Build on Programming I Skills
    • Writing Classes
    • Using Iteration
    • Using non-primitive types (Array, ArrayList, 2D Array)


    Independent Study


    11-12


    Independent Study

    Possible Topics:

    • Programming Languages: Java, JavaScript, Python, Swift
    • Arduino Microcontroller
    • Raspberry Pi Single Board Computers
    • Vex Robotics
    • AP Computer Science A 

     

    TECHNOLOGY: PROGRAMMING AND WEB DEVELOPMENT COURSES

     

    7551 Exploring Computer Science Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits

    This course takes a wide lens on computer science by covering topics such as basic human computer interaction, programming, physical computing, HTML/CSS, and data. Students will build their own websites, apps, games, and physical computing devices.

    7550 Introduction to Web Page Development Semester Grades 9-12 2 Credits

    Front-end Web Development using HTML and CSS can be an exciting and motivating introduction, to get students to “look behind the curtain” at what actually makes their technology resources usable. In this course students will learn the structure of the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), and the structure of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Students will complete their semester with a capstone project where they research, design, and implement a complete multi-page website from scratch.

    7556 Computer Science Principles Year Grades 11, 12 4 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I or teacher recommendationAP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science.

    7109 Introduction to Programming Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I or teacher recommendation.  Computer programming is about writing a clear set of instructions for the computer to perform. In this course, students will begin their journey of learning Object Oriented Programming while creating computer programs in Java.  Students should have strong ability in Algebra and should expect to use their function and word problem skills in class.

    7558 Programming II Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Intro to Programming.  Students will continue on their journey of learning Object Oriented programming while writing code in Java.  Students will work with objects while writing classes of their own demonstrating the power of computers using iteration.  Students will also be introduced to Java’s non-primitive types including Arrays, ArrayLists, and 2D Array.  

    7557 Independent Study in Computer Science Semester Grades 11, 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of AP Computer Science Principles, Introduction to Programming, or Programming 2, and approval of instructor.  Specific topic to be determined by teacher and student, with possible areas of study, including: Programming Languages (Java, JavaScript, Python, Swift), Arduino Microcontroller, Raspberry Pi Single Board Computers, Vex Robotics, AP Computer Science A 

    WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY PATHWAY


    Woodworking Technology courses explore the application of engineering principles to solve practical problems and teach the use of tools, materials, and processes of industry and engineering design. Related science and math principles are stressed throughout all courses while students develop skills using processes of the construction, manufacturing and communications fields. Our program is designed for all students regardless of educational or career goals and provides an in-depth foundation for career preparation.

     

    Woodworking Technology Pathway
    Completion of this pathway will result in: OSHA 10 Hr. Construction Certificate

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    9-12

    Introduction to Woodworking

    Semester Long

    • Fractional Measurement
    • General Woodshop safety / Lab safety
    • Correct machine/hand tool selection and operation
    • Safety tests (4) on stationary machine tools

    10-12

    Advanced Woodworking

    Year Long

    • Order of operations / Sequencing in woodworking
    • Assembly line concepts
    • Material identification and selection
    • Safety tests (2)
    • Introduction to more advanced machine/hand tools
    • Jig and template design

    11-12

    Construction Systems

    Year Long

    • Safety tests (2)
    • Scaled measurement and scaled construction
    • Safety on mobile construction tools used in  industry
    • Structural layout using 16” on center
    • Framing identification and selection
    • Finishing concepts, trim siding, and roofing

    12

    Woods Independent Study

    Year Long

    • Continuation of Woods Program
    • Can be completed in conjunction with senior project
    • Individual Project
    • Detailed scale model
    • In depth cutting boards
    • Custom Adirondack chairs
    • Printing with Laser engraver

    9-12

    Intro to CAD

    Semester Long

    • Blueprint Reading
    • Orthographic, isometric, multi-view drawings
    • Fractional measurement
    • Competency in AutoCAD software
    • Scaled drawing and measurement

     

    WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY COURSES

     

    Technology Education courses explore the application of scientific principles to solve practical problems and teach the use of tools, materials, and processes of industry and engineering design. Related science and math principles are stressed throughout all courses while students develop skills using processes of the construction, manufacturing, transportation, and communications fields.

     

    Our program is designed for all students regardless of educational or career goals and provides an in-depth foundation for career preparation. Students interested in pursuing engineering and/or scientific careers find Technology Education courses beneficial to their program of study. We encourage all students to take advantage of these opportunities.

    7310 Introduction to Woodworking CP Semester Grades 9-12 2 Credits

    This course is the foundation for all woodworking courses at FHS. Introduction to woodworking emphasizes safe practices in the woodshop through the use of multiple stationary machine tools. Students will understand safe tool practices and operate each machine tool safely. Students will gain knowledge in measurement, layout, correct tool application, hand tool usage, use of fasteners and adhesives as well as wood joinery methods. Students also achieve comprehension of structural building techniques. Each student gains familiarity with these tools through introduction, identification, demonstration, use under supervision, and finally through assessment. Fundamental concepts taught in this class are the foundation to advanced woodworking courses. All students must pass required safety tests before operating equipment and/or machinery unsupervised. Any student unable to pass the required safety tests will not be allowed to operate specific machinery unsupervised.

    7203 Intro to CAD and 3D Modeling CP Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in a geometry course

    In this course students learn foundational skills of computer aided drawings and renderings. This class will integrate Autodesk’s AutoCAD and Inventor, the professional software that is the standard for the engineering industry.  With thorough instruction and demonstration, students will develop a foundation in isometric and orthographic projections of geometric figures in AutoCAD.  Building on gained knowledge, students will use Inventor to render 3D models of objects and print these models using the MakerBot 3D printer.

    7311 Advanced Woodworking CP Year Grades 10-12 4 Credits

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to Woodworking and teacher recommendation.  This course is the next step for FHS students interested in woodworking. Advanced Woodworking 1 engages students with more detailed furniture-based projects, mass production methods, and an individual project as part of the year-long course. Students will be able to improve their technique on each stationary machine tool as well as acquire advanced skills in hand tool usage. Developing and engaging the use of jigs, tool selection, and correct procedures form the core of this course. Each student will build their own Adirondack chair in the duration of this course. All students must pass a required safety tests before operating equipment and/or machinery unsupervised. Any student unable to pass the required safety tests will not be allowed to operate specific machinery unsupervised.

    7312 Construction Systems CP Year Grades 11, 12 4 Credits 

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Advanced Woodworking and teacher recommendation.  In this course students will build a scaled mockup of a home including a door, windows and a roof. From there students will construct a full-size shed as a fundraiser for the program. Students will build upon their gained knowledge and vocabulary of the woodshop to construct structurally sound assemblies. Students will understand layout, formal “stick-building”, correct hand nailing, and sequencing as it relates to construction. Also finishing aspects will be highlighted such as; sidewall shingles, roof shingles, trim along with fascia and soffit members. Each student will have an understanding of how a structure is built and the amount of work that goes into it. All students must pass the required safety tests before operating equipment and/or machinery unsupervised. Any student unable to pass the required safety tests will not be allowed to operate specific machinery unsupervised.



    VIDEO PRODUCTION PATHWAY


    This program provides students with skills training for immediate entry into today’s workforce as well as preparation for advanced studies in the fields of cinematography, editing, lighting, sound design, and animation.  Students may take courses to prepare them for an entry-level job immediately after high school or to prepare for a major in film or video production in community college, a two-year college, or a four-year college/university.  The enrolled student is afforded the opportunity to acquire a strong foundation for success in advanced courses at the college level as well as the acquisition of digital literacy skills.  The courses utilize the skills detailed in the FHS Skills Rubrics as well as individual project checklists to assess student performance.

    Video Production Pathway
    Completion of this pathway will result in: Occupational Safety Health Administration
    OSHA 10 HR General Industry Certification

    Grade

    Course/Experience

    Core Skills

    9-12

    Introduction to Video Production CP 

    Semester Long

    • Storyboarding
    • Non-linear editing 
    • Audio mixing
    • Television studio production

    10-12

    Advanced Video Production CP

    Semester Long

    • Cinematography
    • Compositing/animation
    • 360 filming
    • Unmanned Aircraft System Filming (Drone)

    11-12

    Inside FHS CP

    Semester Long

    • Advanced camera techniques
    • Broadcast journalism
    • Media literacy

    12

    Community Filming Internship

    • Broadcast production
    • Advanced editing techniques
    • Portfolio production



    VIDEO PRODUCTION COURSES

    7540 Introduction to Video Production CP Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits 

    Students learn the fundamentals of television production through a variety of projects that give them the opportunity to combine video with graphics, images, and sound to tell a story. From concept to completion, students learn how to plan, shoot, and edit an assignment using digital video tools. Students work in both a TV studio and an editing lab to design and create their projects. They learn about camera techniques, digital editing, audio mixing, and producing video segments. They also learn about positions within a television studio and receive hands-on training to develop their skills. Students are required to participate in the videotaping of one school event per semester. Students may fulfill this requirement by filming in-school assemblies, after-school activities, athletic or performing arts events.  Students are also required to submit an entry in the annual Falmouth High School Animation & Film Festival.

    7541 Advanced Video Production CP Semester Grades 9- 12 2 Credits 

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Video Production.  Students continue to develop and refine their production techniques through a variety of activities that utilize the digital video resources of the TV Studio and the Editing Lab. Students work independently as well as collaboratively to produce video segments for the Falmouth Educational Channel 14. Projects may include silent movies, editorials, writing an original screenplay, and broadcast journalism stories. Students are required to participate in the videotaping of two school events per semester. Students may fulfill this requirement by filming in-school assemblies, after-school activities, athletic or performing arts events. Students are also required to submit an entry in the annual Falmouth High School Animation & Film Festival.

    7514 Inside FHS CP Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Students will have the opportunity to cover news, create editorials and opinion pieces, produce short films, and share information about the people, events, and activities of interest to Falmouth High School. Inside FHS students will produce broadcast-quality work and prepare programs to air on the Falmouth Educational TV Channel 14. Students are expected to devote several hours each week to filming school activities hosted after the regular school day. Students continue to develop their portfolios as they prepare a demo reel for entrance to media technology programs at the university level.  Students are also required to submit an entry in the annual Falmouth High School Animation & Film Festival.

    7542 Community Filming Internship CP Semester Grades 10- 12 2 Credits

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Video Production.  Do you want to be a part of the television industry capturing the action in your school and in your community?  Film real life performances and events!  Receive credit for your passion for video and gain experience for a future career in videography as the events that you film are broadcast on Falmouth’s Educational Access Channel 14.