AP Language Assignment

  • AP English Language and Composition Summer Reading 2019

    The focus of Grade 11 AP Language and Composition is understanding, analyzing, and writing non-fiction prose, connecting fiction prose (drama and novels) to rhetoric and argumentation, and using multiple sources to develop and support your own arguments (Rice).

    In addition to choosing one book from the Junior Summer Reading List, AP Language Students must also choose one book from the following nonfiction list and complete a close reading based on the essential questions provided for that text. I suggest either sticky notes or a journal to record your thinking/analysis. At the conclusion of the book, you should know the author’s purpose (why did they write the book?), you should be able to identify the central message or argument(s) in the text, and you should be able to discuss how the author advanced his or her central message/argument and achieved his or her purpose.

    When you return to class in the fall, we will conduct a weeklong series of seminars centered around each book. You will be the expert on your book and will be asked to provide analysis and commentary about the conversation or “argument” your text elicits.

    In preparation for reading one of the following texts, please read the attached article:  Analysis of Nonfiction Prose as Landscape Language by Bernard Phelan. This article will prepare you for a more advanced approach to rhetorical analysis that will be the foundation of our AP Language and Composition course.

     

    Where Men Win Glory by Jon Krakauer

    • How does Krakauer build his ethical, logical, and emotional appeal throughout the text? Think big picture here. I’m not looking for the individual examples of literary devices so much as I’m looking for the big strategies he employs (structure, style, voice, facts/details, interviews, tone, etc.). What aspects of Jon Krakauer’s narrative style make his telling of Pat Tillman’s story especially persuasive? You might consider how his narrative style in this text differs from Into the Wild, if you read ITW last year.
    • What is Krakauer saying through his telling of Tillman’s story about the stereotypical hero narrative? How does Krakauer either challenge or reinforce traditional ideas about war heroes?
    • What does this text add to societal conversations about war, duty, honor, loyalty to country, patriotism, etc?
    • Does the author’s writing reveal any personal biases or slants in the text? If so, how does it impact your reading of the text? Do you agree or disagree with the author’s message/arguments?

     

    Columbine by David Cullen

    • How does Cullen build his ethical, logical, and emotional appeal throughout the text? Think big picture here. What are the most prominent strategies he employs (structure, style, voice, facts/details, interviews, tone, etc.). For this text, pay particular attention to the use of structure as it relates to suspence and pacing.
    • How does Cullen’s humanization of Eric and Dylan and their parents impact Cullen’s purpose? Do you think this book glorifies Eric and Dylan and perpetuates the legend that they wanted to leave behind?  
    • What is Cullen saying about the role of media in gun violence tragedies?
    • How does this text add to the societal conversations about gun violence and mental illness? What does Columbine teach us about potential solutions to this serious problem in our society?
    • Does the author’s writing reveal any personal biases or slants in the text? If so, how does it impact your reading of the text? Do you agree or disagree with the author’s message/arguments?

     

    The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime that Changed Their Lives by Dashka Slater

    • How does Slater build her ethical, logical, and emotional appeal throughout the text? Think big picture here. What are the most prominent strategies she employs (perspective/POV, structure, style, voice, language, facts/details, tone, etc.) How does Slater’s use of personal pronouns impact the telling of the story?
    • How does this text add to the societal conversations about gender identity? How does this text add to the societal conversations about hate crimes and discrimination? What message does the text offer as a solution for these issues?
    • What role does the media play in shaping how we see criminal cases?
    • Does the author’s writing reveal any personal biases or slants in the text? If so, how does it impact your reading of the text? Do you agree or disagree with the author’s message/arguments?

     

    Born a Crime: Stories from A South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

    • How does Noah build his ethical, logical, and emotional appeal throughout the text? Think big picture here. What are the most prominent strategies he employs (humor, POV, structure, style, voice, historical context, tone, etc.). You might pay particular attention to Noah’s use of humor and personal experience and its impact on the audience.
    • What does Noah suggest about identity and belonging in light of his interracial identity?
    • How does this text add to the societal conversations about race? Are Noah’s experiences with South Africa and apartheid applicable to race in the United States? If so, what lessons does Noah offer the reader about race, language, and how race is taught as a subject?
    • Does the author’s writing reveal any personal biases or slants in the text? If so, how does it impact your reading of the text? Do you agree or disagree with the author’s message/arguments?







Last Modified on June 11, 2019