Grade 10 Summer Reading List

  • Falmouth High School Grade 10 Summer Reading List 2020 

     

    Purpose: The Summer Reading Program encourages students to enjoy, think about, and evaluate what they read. 

    Reading/Writing Requirements: Summer reading is worth up to 10% of your first-quarter grade. Read the book closely and be prepared for an assessment during the first week of school in September.

    • CP1 and CP 2 students choose one book from the list below. 
    • Honors students must read J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and one book from the list below, and must complete assignments for The Catcher in the Rye, due the first week of school in September (assignment available through Mrs. Kasparian’s Google Classroom--email her for access: dkasparian@falmouth.k12.ma.us). 

    EXTRA CREDIT for CP students: You may earn extra credit by reading a second book from this list and keeping a journal using the summer reading journal prompts (journal assignment is handed out in the fall and is available on the FHS website). OR, you may earn extra credit by completing the podcast assignment.

     

     

  • Six of Crows

    by Leigh Bardugo Year Published:

    A thrilling tale of double-crosses, buried secrets, and one fantastical heist. Bardugo drops readers right into the midst of her richly imagined fantasy world and the lives of a dynamic team of thieves, artfully weaving details and backstories throughout the speedy plot. 

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  • Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun

    by Geoffrey Canada Year Published:

    A memoir of coming of age in the South Bronx; teenagers deal with the terrible consequences that adult violence has brought to their world.

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  • Crackback

    by John Coy Year Published:

    Always a starter on his high school football team, Miles changes his life’s direction when a new coach takes over. 

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  • All the Light We Cannot See

    by Anthony Doerr Year Published:

    The beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

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  • Turtles All the Way Down

    by John Green Year Published:

    Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

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  • Almost American Girl

    by Robin Ha Year Published:

    For as long as she can remember, it’s been Robin and her mom against the world. Growing up as the only child of a single mother in Seoul, Korea, wasn’t always easy, but it has bonded them fiercely together. So when a vacation to visit friends in Huntsville, Alabama, unexpectedly becomes a permanent relocation—following her mother’s announcement that she’s getting married—Robin is devastated. A memoir in graphic novel form.

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  • Hoop Dreams

    by Ben Joravsky Year Published:

    The desperate, and usually impossible, dream of making it in professional sports is exposed with heartbreaking truthfulness. It is the story of Chicago high school basketball and dreams of the NBA. 

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  • Stamped: Racism, Anti-Racism, and You

    by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi Year Published:

    “This is NOT a history book.

    This is a book about the here and now.

    A book to help us better understand why we are where we are.

    A book about race.”

    The construct of race has always been used to gain and keep power, to create dynamics that separate and silence. This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited.

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  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

    by Benjamin Alire Saenz Year Published:

    Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime.

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  • Falling Into Place

    by Amy Zhang Year Published:

    One cold fall day, high school junior Liz Emerson steers her car into a tree. This haunting and heartbreaking story is told by a surprising and unexpected narrator and unfolds in nonlinear flashbacks even as Liz's friends, foes, and family gather at the hospital and Liz clings to life. This riveting novel will appeal to fans of Before I Fall, by Lauren Oliver, and 13 Reasons Why, by Jay Asher. 

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Last Modified on June 15, 2020